A Simple, No-BS Leadership Strategy…

In Leadership
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A woman was offering me some examples to prove a point she was failing to make. 

Her first point didn’t make sense and I told her why. 

She made a different point. That one didn’t make sense either. 

The third try wasn’t any better. Since she’d asked, I told her about that one, too. 

She wasn’t very happy by this point. 

I was against her. 

A negative person. 

A contrarian. 

Whatever the problem was, Dre was clearly the source. Her reason: I’d rejected “every” example that had been shared. So if I couldn’t agree with at least one, the problem must be me. 

I’ve often found myself in conversations with Correctness Socialists. 

What’s a Correctness Socialist? These are folks who think that because Person A has had the right idea twice in a row, it’s Person B’s turn to be right now. Correctness Socialists believe that everyone’s ideas and information should be equally accepted so as to offer an equal amount of shine to everyone. 

WRONG. 

Not all ideas are created equally. 

Many people have ideas; some have lots of crappy ideas and some have lots of good ideas (depending on the topic). Just because one girl in the room has had the best idea three times in a row, doesn’t mean she can’t have the best idea a fourth straight time. Maybe she’s the smartest person in the room. 

If you have seven examples that all fail to prove your point, you’re not being discriminated against — your arguments just suck. If your ideas and solutions are being ignored, maybe it’s not “hate” — maybe you just aren’t good at coming up with good ideas or having the right answers. 

Leadership, like life, is not an equal-opportunity deal. Treating everyone equally will never work, because everyone ain’t equal. 

***

Amazon lists their Principles of Leadership on their website. 

One of the principles: Leaders Are Right, A Lot.

What that means (for life, as well as at Amazon): 

1) People in authority know what they’re talking about, usually better than those who are not in authority. That’s how they got there and that’s how they stay there. 

2) They seek opinions from outside of their circle to make sure they have the best information, not just the info that serves their ego. 

3) They challenge their own ideas before they share them, and are open to changing them when they get new information. 

4) The person who knows the most should be the one in charge. If that happens to be the same person today that it was last time and the time before that, so what? 

I dove into this, and more of Amazon’s principles, in episode #895: Amazon’s 14 Principles of Leadership, Pt. 1 and 2, here: http://DreAllDay.com/895-