Book Review: The Law Of Success by Napoleon Hill

In Blog, Book Reviews, Discipline, Leadership
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“One of the peculiarities of Leadership is the fact that it is never found in those who have not acquired the habit of taking the initiative. Leadership is something that you must invite yourself into; it will never thrust itself upon you. If you will carefully analyze all leaders whom you know you will see that they not only exercised Initiative, but they went about their work with a definite purpose in mind. You will also see that they possessed that quality described in the third lesson of this course, Self-confidence.”

Wow. Where do I begin with this book?

How about here: Every principle of any self-help/personal development book you can purchase is explained, in detail, by Napoleon Hill in The Law Of Success.

Or here: The Law Of Success is a better book than the book Hill is better known for, Think & Grow Rich.

Or here: This book could stand as replacement for every other self-help or personal development book you own. Read this one alone, and you’ll have all the information contained in all the others. Really.

I initially read Think & Grow Rich back in college, but surely didn’t know enough about life to appreciate the words within. After finding some Napoleon Hill audio recordings on Spotify some months ago, I took a liking to his style and found this book, his much less-ballyhooed product. TGR has a much catchier title, so I get why it’s lived a more famous life (Lesson 6: Imagination).

The Law Of Success is a long book, but worth every page and all of the time you’ll take in reading it. 16 lessons of life that cover every aspect of your being, no matter your age, background or vocation. This book has barged its way into my all-time top 5.

Do you aim for success? Can you read? Then I command you to read this book.

the law of success napoleon hill dreallday.com

4 Comments

  1. What’s up Dre,

    First, I’d like to say I appreciate all your book recommendations/reviews!

    Second, I’m in the process of reading this book and I’m having trouble developing a definite chief aim (DCA) because I have multiple desires/interests. In your opinion or understanding of the concept, is it okay to have more than one DCA or is it imperative to stick to only one?

    Thanks,
    Jourdan

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