Can’t Do It All Myself: Superman Syndrome

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Can't Do It All Myself: Superman Syndrome Dre baldwin DreAllDay.comI suffer from Superman Syndrome: a person who has lots of aims, and (often) tries to achieve all of those aims, at the same damn time, via his own efforts. (This can be Superwoman too; -man is used here to make it simple and because I’m a male.)
The good thing about Superman is he usually gets a lot of it done, and quite impressively. Mere mortals cannot fathom how he does it. To most, he really is Superman.

The bad thing about Superman is, he can never maximize anything as well as he would if he would either:

  1. Drop most of his interests/ buisneses/ products and focus on only ONE
  2. Get some (or a lot of) assistance on everything so Superman is free to do what only Superman needs to be doing; i.e. the essential Superman tasks like saving the universe while someone else answers email.

Well, #1 ain’t happening. And if you’re a Superman, you understand this all too well. So #2 it is. You (I) must learn to leverage the time, talents and energy of other people to further your cause (and theirs too – I’ll explain).

Here’s how, in both mindset and action:

  1. Understand that everything you don’t do well, someone else is an expert at. Find them and get that person on your team.
  2. Know that anything you don’t like doing, you don’t have to force yourself to do! Find the person who does like it (or likes it enough to do it with a smile) and get that person on your team.
  3. Realize that not everyone is like you, wanting to be Superman. There are people who want to be second-in-command, have steady work and a steady check, or just be a part of a winning team, with no lust for the headlines, trophies and glory. Fulfill their desires.

Where to begin:

  1. Identify who you need on your team and seek those people. See what they do, how they do it, and what it costs…
  2. What if I don’t have money? How can I pay these people? Then get creative. You’ve seen Shark Tank, right? Entrepreneurs don’t pay to be invested in, they offer something of value (a percentage stake in their company) in exchange for resources (the money and knowledge of the investor). You can do the same, just swapping out the elements.

If you’re an entrepreneur who wants to do big things, you need a team. Look at the business leaders you admire most — don’t they all have teams of assistants, media people, and who knows what else? Don’t these business leaders all seem positioned to do only what they do well, while placing everyone else in a space to do their job? This is how great enterprises work: each piece properly placed.

As the person on top, it’s your job to find, arrange and place these pieces.

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