Complaining Customers Are The Opportunity

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I went to Chipotle yesterday to pick up two bowls and one burrito, all ordered via their (impressive) mobile website.

I got home to see they’d made what was supposed to be a burrito as a bowl.

I tweeted Chipotle about the mistake, and was tweeted back to go to their customer feedback page and fill out a form.

Bad business.

When a customer complains to me about any of my products, that’s our turn to show them just how great we are. We reply fast, apologize for any inconveniences, and do what we can to appease them — even it if means issuing a full refund.

When I’m unhappy about my service as a buyer, I’d grown up to expect uncooperative customer service agents whose only mission was to cite company policy, stonewall and get rid of me as fast as possible. If I got angry, so what? Except in extreme cases, the world would never find out.

In 2017, the game has changed.

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As all consumers now have their own broadcast stations in the palm of their hands, we expect companies to respond swiftly and graciously to our issues and make things work. On twitter, I’ve been able to get refunds, discount codes and avoid long customer service hold times just by sending a tweet to a company. Every single one of them, I’ve continued to be a customer of, as well, because of the grace with which they handled the issue.

I was surprised that Chipotle, with its seamless and smooth online ordering system, would be handling complaints as if it’s still 2007.

The next time a patron of your business in unhappy, you have a golden opportunity to shine. Treat your customers as best you can, even when they’re pointing out your screw-ups, and you buy customer’s for life — even when issuing refunds.

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