Heat Monster: You Want The Attention? Be Careful What You Ask For

February 24, 2014 Heat Monster: You Want The Attention? Be Careful What You Ask For

Heat Monster dre baldwinWhen you have some respectable level of talent or skill — but you lack the “in” that can get you in front of the audience that can “put you on” — then, you’ll need to employ more than just your talent or skill.

That’s becoming easier and easier to do now since we all have access to free tools in social meadia and blogs, websites, etc., so money is not the issue. And neither is time — you can do 95% of your interneting from your smartphone. And everybody has one.

What stops people is the heat people feel when they get too close to the oven.

The heat I speak of is the attention you’re asking for when you put yourself — and your assumed skill — out there in front of the public. Random people whom you’ll never meet will criticize you, sometimes in a intentionally nasty way. People will make jokes and tell you you’re not as good as some random famous person who does the same thing or that the commentator’s cousin is twice as good as you. People will openly wonder if you’ve made the highest level and try to make you feel there’s something wrong with you if you haven’t.

Hiding isn’t an option. When you put yourself out there, the heat will find you.

Many a talented person saw and felt that heat approaching and turned around, back into the crowd where it was nice and cool. Talent, forever wasted. About 10% of the population resides here.

Some step into the cauldron and sweat it out, but get tired of replenishing fluids. Gatorade is expensive! They climb out of the pot, never to return. Another 10% stays here.

Can’t forget about the heat generators — those whose attention you’re aiming for. These aren’t necessarily bad people, it just feels that way to some when all those eyes are on you. 75% of people make up this mass.

That last 5% become oblivious to the heat. They sweat every day and wake up in a puddle every morning. They stock up on towels and electrolyte-heavy fluids and foods. They’re uncomfortable in cooler temperatures. The heat feels like home. They don’t notice the eyes, and when they do, they’re happy about it — the work they put in deserves the heat.

And when it’s not hot enough, they turn the heat up when they want to.

From the Bench To Basketball Pro in 5 Years?

 

Started playing at age 14. Only played one year of varsity basketball - and sat the bench. Walked on in college and played NCAA D3. Then I signed my first professional basketball contract at age 23, starting a 9-year pro basketball journey.

My first book Buy A Game shares the story with you -- read if free right now!

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