How To Destroy — Or Build — Your Future…

In Discipline
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Delayed gratification isn’t fun. 

That’s why so few people engage in it. 

The most popular phone apps, the social media that sucks time from you, are all based on instant gratification. 

10-second Stories. INSTA-gram. And endless feed of status updates that will continue feeding you if you continue scrolling. 

We’re being conditioned to want what we want NOW, and to complain about it when it doesn’t happen fast enough. And the world complies with this demand. 

So… where’s the opportunity??? 

In the opposites. 

The more successful a person is, or is on their way to becoming, the further into the future one plans, thinks and projects. 

The more successful a person is, or is on their way to becoming, the further into the future one plans, thinks and projects. Click To Tweet

You make decisions based on delayed gratification, not on right-now pleasures or the immediate results of your actions. 

The more work you’re willing to do now — and less payoff you’re willing to accept today in exchange for that work. 

You do without (time, money, attention, ego satisfaction) today, in order to have more tomorrow (or a few hundred tomorrows from now). 

The more successful you expect to be, the more of a delay of gratification you’re willing to accept — and the more often.

This is why a 250-page book has inherently more value than a 10-minute YouTube video: the book takes longer to create, which I’m biased to believe requires more thinking and research and fine-tuning (though this is surely not always true). 

AND, in general, fewer people read books than watch videos — so whatever value that’s in the book, the fewer people who know about it. Anyone can watch a 10-minute video, that value is highly circulated and les rare. Scarcity is value. 

Less-successful people want everything now. They don’t want to wait, to plan, or to discipline themselves. All of that takes work, and work takes time. 

Less successful people don’t think about their future. They think about today. And there are plenty of popular sayings they can fish out to justify this way of thinking. 

If you want to lengthen your time perspective, ask yourself the following: what am I doing today that will matter or pay off in ten years? 

If you want to lengthen your time perspective, ask yourself the following: what am I doing today that will matter or pay off in ten years? Click To Tweet

What work am I doing that shows no tangible payoff now, but it will over time, as I accumulate more and more of this same output (example: writing a page or two every day for your upcoming book)? 

How often am I delaying gratification and not allowing my impulses to control my decision making? 

When planning my life, how far into the future do I think? 

Do I have goals? If so, how far out do I make them? 

One day? 

A week? 

A month? 

A year? 

Five years? 

Twenty?

Lifetime? 

Your perspective on time is a reflection of your expectations: how far you plan on going, how long you plan on being around, how long your work will matter. 

Sure, live for today — it’s the present, it’s all we truly have, etc. 

But don’t forget about tomorrow, as you just might make it there. Wouldn’t it be great if you had a head start upon arrival? 

Think about what you’re doing now to aid your future today. Your future self will thank you. 

By the way, I created the following MasterClasses on time perspective, delaying gratification, and planning for your future: 

#777: How Your Time Perspective Determines Your Success

#33: Why You Need To Value Time Over Money

#45: How To Stop Wasting Time And Filling Time With Meaningless Work

#219: “Why Am I Spending Time With YOU?”

#461: Stop Sleepwalking!!! Time is Your One True Boss

#536: How To Protect Your Time Like You Should

#738: Do Not Waste Time Waiting

you’ll get full access to all of these, plus a thousand more (really!), as a member of the Game Group. I have a FREE 14-day trial waiting for you as well, so go here to get started: http://WorkOnMyGame.com/GameGroup

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