“I Didn’t’ Do Anything Wrong!” [Daily Game]

April 20, 2018 “I Didn’t’ Do Anything Wrong!” [Daily Game]

That’s my Lyft driver Jenry from this morning. He did his job, at least by the description of what a Lyft driver is supposed to do: Picked me up at the designated location, drove me to my destination, and stopped there to let me out of his car.

All fine and good. Except —

  • Jenry saw me with a rolling suitcase when he pulled up to my building — he didn’t get out of his car to help with the bag.
  • He didn’t even greet with a “good morning” when I got in the car.
  • Jenry again didn’t get out of the car when dropping me off at MIA. Didn’t say goodbye. And he drove off a soon as the trunk door closed.

What’s the big deal, Dre? He did his job. It’s not written in Lyft’s rules that they have to help carry bags. And when did saying hi and bye become something to complain about? 

All these counter-points are technically 100% correct. And that’s exactly the (your?) problem, especially if you’re a salesperson (you are).

For Your Game

  1. If you ever have to defend your work performance with “I didn’t do anything wrong,” you also haven’t done anything right. Working to not mess up is the same as playing not to lose. You know what that leads to. If you don’t know, make sure that you never find out. Go above the average with your confidence via The Super You and apply it to the rest of your life.
  2. When you’re working in a service-based business (where you dosomething in exchange for money, as opposed to giving something, such as a book or bottled water), bare minimum effort gets you bare minimum returns. This is especially important in the anonymous-review era of Yelp and Google and, Lyft driver reviews. Service workers usually make tips (Jenry got $0) and sell more product the better they make their clients and customers feel. No one has taught this to Jenry.
  3. How you do anything is how you do everything. We don’t flip switches on and off through our day. Small things tell you a lot about a person. A person who works the way Jenry works, lives the same way. Bare minimum effort, doing “nothing wrong,” getting the bare minimum back from life, and probably not understanding why all this is even an issue. It all makes sense. Build your effort muscle with 30 Days To Discipline.

Here’s the Instagram post on the same situation.

Have you ever been on the receiving end of “just enough” service? How did you feel? Reply and let me know. 

#WorkOnYourGame

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