If 20 People Are Talking About You, Ignore 19 Of Them…

In Mental Toughness
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NFL quarterback Cam Newton has an amazing 2015 season. 

Cam’s team went 15-1. He won the NFL MVP award. His team went all the way to the Super Bowl. 

NFL players rarely reach the same popularity levels as their basketball-playing counterparts in the NBA. But Cam achieved this in 2015. 

Everyone was a Cam Newton fan — if not of his football performance, then of his touchdown celebration dances. You knew about Cam even if you didn’t watch the NFL. 

But, Cam’s Carolina Panthers lost the Super Bowl. 

Their Denver Broncos opponent, knowing Cam to be the engine of the Panther attack, keyed on slowing down Cam and beat them. 

Cam did not have his best performance in the Super Bowl. He knew it, and was dejected enough after the defeat to walk out the postgame press conference prematurely. 

Suddenly, there weren’t so many Cam Newton fans. They’d all become detractors. 

People criticized Cam’s sportsmanship and professionalism for the press conference walk-out. 

Said he didn’t play hard enough because he failed to dive on the ground for a late-game fumble. 

Tweeted that Cam needed to grow up and show more dignity, more fight, in tough situations. 

Whether I or you agree with these statements is not the point. The point is about how quickly the tide turned on Cam. 

What surprised me was how it was damn near impossible to find anyone saying a negative word about Cam Newton throughout the 2015 NFL season. 

But, as soon as he’d lost, it seemed as if everyone had been storing ammunition to use against Cam, and finally had their shot. 

From seeing this, I formulated what I call the 95% Rule when it comes to public opinion (that is, of people who don’t know you — but they know of you and your work.)

95% of people base their opinion of you on how well — or how poorly — they think you’re doing at the moment. 

So, when you’re winning, they’re the people telling you how great you are and hoping to catch a whiff of your success by pure association — even if that association is merely being a fan. 

When you’re losing, these same people are the ones posting memes, writing articles and composing viral tweets bashing you. 

Therefore, be careful about buying in to what you hear from the 95% — good and bad. Most of the time, they’re just following the consensus. 

Don’t get too excited when they love you, and don’t read into it too deeply when they’re trashing you. 

The other 5%? They never change how they feel about you, regardless of your situation. In the 5%, the haters always hate, the lovers always love, and the indifferent go on not caring. 

You need some 5%ers in your corner — to let you know that you’re still mortal even when you’re winning, and to remind you when you’re losing that this too, shall pass. 

I took my deepest Mental Game material and put it into a what I call the Bulletproof Mindset Manual 1.0

I made it so you can get your have all the material for mastering your Mental Game “on paper” —- which means you can make a real study and habit of mastering what’s going on in your head. 

It’s damn near 400 pages long, and every page earned its way into the Manual. Get full details here: http://WorkOnMyGame.com/BPMM

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