RIP Kobe Bryant

In Basketball
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Musicians, actors and online influencers have niche audiences. 

“Niche” doesn’t necessarily mean “small.” It just means there’s a pocket of people who are into whatever it is that known person does. 

When Nipsey Hussle passed away last year, there were a lot of people who had no idea who Nipsey was. Not everyone listens to rap, and not every rap fan listens to every rapper. 

It would be the same for a film actor (I, personally, don’t watch movies), country music star or motivational Instagrammer. Everything ain’t for everybody. 

Athletes, on the other hand, can ascend to a level above niche. A superstar athlete can transcend personal preference. They can extend their reach deep into the bubbles that would otherwise never notice them. 

There are only a handful of them, though. Kobe Bryant was one. 

Athletes, on the other hand, can ascend to a level above niche. A superstar athlete can transcend personal preference. They can extend their reach deep into the bubbles that would otherwise never notice them. There are only a handful of… Click To Tweet

My mother couldn’t name one song by any rapper that I or you listen to. But she was the first one in the family to send a group text about Kobe’s passing yesterday. 

Besides Michael Jordan and LeBron, Kobe was the most famous basketball player alive. He was one-name status. 

And now he, his young teenage daughter, and five others are gone, just like that. 

It’s one thing when someone dies from circumstances of their lifestyle or environment (as Nipsey did, or a soldier getting killed in combat) — you can rationalize that since you don’t live that life, it couldn’t happen to you. 

It’s another when an older person passes and we can attribute it to age (such as in the passing of former NBA commissioner David Stern three weeks ago at age 77). I’m young, you say, so I don’t have to worry about that. 

It’s a whole other thing, though, when it’s completely random and affects someone who’s not that much different from you. 

Kobe was 41. I turn 38 next Monday. 

Kobe was healthy. He was doing positive things, running a business, raising his kids and being an ambassador of the game. 

He died doing something that he’d done seemingly thousands of times, riding in his helicopter. A freak accident just happened to occur this one time… and it’s over. 

Just like that. 

This is not a situation where we can advise others to stay away from violence and conflict, nor can I tell you to take care of your physical and mental health to avoid Kobe’s fate. 

Kobe seemed to have all of that in check, and he still lost his life in an instant. 

The best message I can share from this is the message Kobe shared for his Kobe 4 Nike sneakers: Carpe Diem. 

Seize The Day. 

Live the unlived life within you. 

The best message I can share from this is the message Kobe shared for his Kobe 4 Nike sneakers: Carpe Diem. Seize The Day. Live the unlived life within you.  Click To Tweet

We are all on the clock. Whether you believe the amount of time you have left is predetermined or not is immaterial. What we can all agree on is that none of us knows how much time is left in our personal hourglasses. 

Here’s the recording of the livestream I did on Instagram last night: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Cjl77OCIvPY

Here’s today’s Work On Your Game Show, full content open to ALL listeners: Kobe Bryant: Carpe Diem | Rest In Peace Tribute

[YouTube] https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=bFHozOg7YxI

[Apple Podcasts] https://podcasts.apple.com/us/podcast/work-on-your-game-with-dre-baldwin/id1102601387#episodeGuid=tag%3Asoundcloud%2C2010%3Atracks%2F750158620

[Spotify] https://open.spotify.com/episode/2IkAwqIMbMpuqe0mWqGCDs?si=cqIOd9ZcRvOStAUZ81PCLw

And a post I put on Instagram this morning in honor of Kobe: https://www.instagram.com/p/B70zQXMgeJ2/?igshid=1pnr8cpxes79b

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