The Benefits Of Teaching Yourself…

In People Skills
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In basketball, there was one key way for me to know when people really admired my game. 

It was when, after seeing me play, players would start asking questions. 

Where are you from? 

Did you play in college or anything? 

Are you playing with anyone in XXXXX league? We could use someone… 

How often do you come around here? 

Who taught you how to play? 

Well, no one taught me how to play — I just kept showing up to the playground, alone, and practiced until things started working. 

Luckily for me, things did work. 

These days, post-basketball, I strive to deliver in such a way to evoke the same feelings from people in my current audiences. 

I gave a speech last week. 

One of the best parts of professional speaking is the moment right after leaving the stage, when people who just listened to you come to shake your hand, take photos, ask questions and find out how to further engage with you. 

The “handshake line” serves the ego in ways that cannot be replicated. 

Someone asked me if I’d ever taken formal speaking classes or had training. I told her that I hadn’t — but I do have my “10,000 hours” of practice via years of YouTube publishing and podcasting. 

As the saying goes, after you put in years of work, you’re eligible to become an “overnight success.” 

The key to making yourself good when you’ve developed your game informally (that is, without studying it in school or taking a class or hiring a coach) is to keep honing your skills. 

Simple to understand. A bit harder to do. But still the key. 

Keep writing and recording. Every day, if you can. 

Figure out your message(s) and master it/them. 

Put as much of your personality and personal story in your message as possible. The more that’s in there, the more it remains proprietary.  

Get comfortable with yourself and your style, as people don’t buy into what you say as much as they buy how you say it

And remember the advantage of being “self-taught:” you don’t have a blueprint to follow. Your method is inherently unique. 

Keep it that way. 

Get comfortable with yourself and your style, as people don't buy into what you say as much as they buy how you say it.  And remember the advantage of being “self-taught:” you don't have a blueprint to follow. Your method is inherently… Click To Tweet

What are the quirks in your game that some criticize you for — but if it weren’t for those quirks, your game would never stand out? 

By the way, I’ve given several MasterClasses on creation, branding and mastering your message in the Game Group — and you are invited to a FREE 14-day trial membership to experience it for yourself.

Get started here: http://WorkOnMyGame.com/GameGroup 

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