The Opportunity of Directness…

In Personal Initiative
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Confronting people used to be normal. It was common practice to be direct, disagreeable, even to attack. 

We dished it out, and we expected people to send it our way as well. 

Back in the day at the theatres, audience members would boo and hiss, throw tomatoes at the stage and voice their opinions viscerally about the show. 

Politicians would scuffle in the streets over policy disagreements. 

Growing up, kids toughened each other up by fist-fighting in the streets. And parents toughened us up by yelling at, criticizing and whooping their kids’ asses on an as-needed basis. 

None of this was a bad thing. No one complained. It was accepted as part of the experience. 

Today, people seem to be allergic to any form of confrontation. 

Coaches can’t yell at their players. 

Newer generations would rather text than talk on the phone. 

I haven’t seen a parent smack the shit out of an acting-up kid in a long time. 

People vent their aggression through social media posts and under-the-breath mumblings instead of direct communication. 

There was an quasi-wrestling match in an NBA game last week between two 7-foot guys, an episode that people got all excited about, labeling it a “fight.” 

Both guy got suspended two games each, more because of the shit-talking they did on Instagram after the game than their actions on the court. 

I’d more accurately call what happened a “skirmish.” 

When someone with the “old school” mentality of directness comes into an environment, people react to them as if they’re offended by such an approach. 

The new wave seems to be, “the less direct, the better.” 

So, where’s the opportunity? 

As with most things, it’s in the opposite of what most everyone else is doing. 

When a customer spends a significant amount of money with you, surprise them with a phone call. 

Have a conversation with the front desk attendant that everyone else just brushes past with— at the most— “hi” and “bye.” 

Stop wasting time beating around the bush of what you really want to say to someone and just say it. 

People may be surprised, uncomfortable with or even taken aback by such directness. 

But they always respect it. 

The following two MasterClasses — out of the “Real Conversation” category in the Game Group Membership — will help you put this idea into practice: 

#1230: Why You Avoid Uncomfortable Conversation

#1030: Why You Need To Be Challenged, Questioned And Pushed

[A Bonus one — if you don’t mind] #894: How To Be Less Of A People-Pleaser

Access all of these and 1,300 more like it as a member of the Game Group — your first two weeks are free on me: http://WorkOnMyGame.com/GameGroup

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