When NBA Players Became HBCU Fans For A Week…

In Basketball, Blog, Personal Growth, Stories
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It’s easier to give money than to give time. 

 

You can give money in ten places at once while barely paying attention. Your body can only be in one place at a time, though. 

 

The saying goes, “put your money where your mouth is.” 

 

I say, “put your feet where your belief is.”

 

[If you want to know what to do with your life, don’t search for your passion –– look at your energy and attention. Where are you spending your time? That’s what you should do for a living.]

 

I followed the NBA All-Star Game and was shocked to see all the attention paid to HBCUs (Historically Black College And Universities) during the week and on the broadcast. There is just one –– ONE –– current NBA player who attended an HBCU. 

 

Most American-born NBA players were stars coming out of high school. They all had multiple D1 scholarship offers to choose amongst. In other words, they could have gone to any school they wanted to go to. 

 

I don’t have stats on what I’m about to say, but I welcome anyone to challenge me on it: Most of your favorite American-born NBA players didn’t have a single HBCU on their shortlist of schools (i.e., scholarships to accept). They probably didn’t even take any official visits to an HBCU. 

 

I get it though. 

 

As far as sports go, HBCUs cannot compete with PWIs (Predominantly White Institutions) in terms of funding, facilities competition, or exposure. If I had LeBron or Kobe’s pedigree (and was, unlike them, going to college), I doubt I’d be even thinking about an HBCU with the likes of Duke or UCLA calling and texting me. I’ve been to the campuses of both HBCUs and big-name PWIs (and attended Penn State). 

 

On the surface –– the way an 18-year-old kid would be looking at things –– they’re not even in the same league. 

 

All your favorite NBA players passed on HBCUs (though any HBCU would have gladly taken them). Now, the NBA spends a week celebrating HBCUs. It was funny to me, since none of the star NBA players went to one –– but they had recorded videos, custom sneakers and printed t-shirts celebrating HBCUs. 

 

These guys have been Black all their lives. Where was this HBCU love when you were being recruited? 

 

Again: I get it. The latest Social Justice wave has everyone more cognizant of race and what it means to be Black in America. Now you can solidify your Blackness by advocating for HBCUs, long after you would have proven it by actually… you know, attending one. 

 

[Full disclosure: I had a 50% scholarship to Morehouse College coming out of high school, and planned to attend Morehouse. Morehouse’s out-of-state tuition is $48,000/year. I couldn’t afford the other 50%. Hence, Penn State.] 

 

I don’t mind the NBA All-Stars being fans of HBCUs. I suppose you can pass on an opportunity to be a part of something while still being a fan of it. But when these players could’ve put their career prospects in the hands of an HBCU, they all passed. 

 

Now they’re HBCU cheerleaders. 

 

FOH. 

 

It was interesting to see all the HBCU alumni and current students oh so happy to be thrown a bone by the NBA and their players who’d ignored HBCUs when they had the chance but are now fans. 

 

Right. 

 

But we don’t hate the game. Gotta play the game. 

 

Nobody was harmed in the process of all of this coming about; it’s not a bad thing at all. I just like noticing the way the game is played on a political level and how everyone doesn’t see it –– or pretends as if they don’t. 

 

For people like me who do notice it, there’s plenty of juicy material available these days. 

 

Speaking of politics, get your FREE copy of my book The Mirror Of Motivation so you can be the ideal version of yourself –– which means people will want to follow you and be a part of your movement. 

 

Claim your copy here: http://MirrorOfMotivation.com