Why To Go The “Extra Mile” — Even When It Goes Unrecognized…

In Leadership
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I was on a walk when I saw an Uber driver pull to the curb in front of me. 

Three women, each pulling a rolling suitcase, crossed the street to meet the Uber. 

The trunk of the Uber, a Honda something, popped open. 

As I approached the car from the front, I noted the Uber driver in the car. He was fidgeting with his phone. As I passed the car, I saw the women lift their suitcases into the trunk as they chatted amongst themselves. 

In my 2 seconds of observing them, it didn’t appear that the women had expected the driver to help with their bags — they were dutifully loading the trunk on their own. The driver probably treated every luggage-toting rider the same way he’d done these females. 

And, between the two parties, it’s a good chance that no one saw anything wrong with what had transpired on that corner. 

I didn’t either. It’s not like I called Uber to complain.

What I saw with that driver and his riders was a “little thing” that many people would dismiss and trivial and not even worth mentioning. 

And to those people: you’re right. 

People who think little things don’t matter, dismiss the little things. Most of the time, they don’t even notice that the little thing exists. 

Things like getting out of your car to help a rider with their bags, even if they appear fully capable of doing it on their own. 

Things like not “wasting your time” following up with a prospect who seems a mortal lock to not buy your product. 

Things like ignoring the internal design of your product, since that’s not the part that its users will ever see. 

And when something doesn’t work out, these same folks point to some Big Thing that must have caused the issue. 

Not making money with Uber because rides are cheap and don’t tip. 

Broke prospects who always browse but never buy. 

The coach hating on you. 

The economy being down and no one wanting to spend. 

Pure bad luck. 

It makes sense that people often disregard the little things. They’re little. The immediate ROI on the attention paid to them is often negligible. Someone wrote a book about not sweating the small stuff. 

The basic, but rarely emotionally understood fact: big things don’t just appear out of nowhere. 

A hundred-mile journey is just one mile, covered a hundred times. 

A thousand-dollar product, sold to one thousand individual customers, equals one million dollars. 

Small things add up, but they add up so quietly, so inconspicuously, that they’re often ignored — until they’re combined forces to become a Big Thing. 

Small things add up, but they add up so quietly, so inconspicuously, that they’re often ignored — until they’re combined forces to become a Big Thing.  Click To Tweet

And then, because the small things were never acknowledged, no one quite understands where the Big Thing came from. 

Leaders notice little things. They harp over little things. They sweat the small stuff. 

Leaders notice little things. They harp over little things. They sweat the small stuff.  Click To Tweet

Why? 

One reason is, they understand how the little things quietly add up to the Big Thing. 

Another: because very few others do so. And the opportunity is always in the opposites. 

And, one more reason: you never know when the person who you’re dealing with today is one of those leaders, a person who notices all the little stuff, and how that person’s observation and positive impression of you could change everything for you. 

If you’ve built the habit through always doing the little things, you don’t even have to remind yourself. 

You should listen to and take notes on the following MasterClasses about habits and the little things: 

#146: Habits & Employees

#783: How to Examine And Develop Quality Habits

#964: Why You Should Sweat The Small Stuff

#574: One Small Shift Could Change Everything

#1272: Learning To Pay Attention

#802: How To Pay Less Attention To What Others Are Doing

#697: You Can’t Afford to Get Caught Not Paying Attention

You can get full access to these and 1,357 more MasterClasses on every topic to advance your mindset, business and life, as a Game Group Member. 

I’ve created a FREE 14-day trial for you to experience the Game Group for yourself. 

Get started here: http://WorkOnMyGame.com/GameGroup

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